Spring forward: 2017 daylight saving time begins on Sunday

Source   Elizabeth Lies  Unsplash

Source Elizabeth Lies Unsplash

Beginning at 2 a.m. EST Sunday, Americans will have to manually reset their clocks one hour earlier and, unfortunately, probably lose a little bit of sleep.

In 1784, Benjamin Franklin joked that Parisians could reduce their candle usage if they just got out of bed earlier. For most of the USA, the change officially starts Sunday at 2 a.m. local time.

State governments and other groups have made efforts to have the practice overturned via legislation or online petitions. Back then, it was called Fast Time during the first and War Time during the second, and no state could opt out.

How long does Daylight Saving Time last? Arizona and Hawaii also do not observe daylight saving time. Some of the original proposals were a lot worse than the single one hour time change we have today.

An examination of mining injuries from 1983 to 2006 revealed that the Monday after a time change, workers sustained more injuries compared to the rest of the year.

Regardless of the possible changes, daylight saving time is happening this weekend, and we'll get an extra hour of sunlight while anxiously awaiting the start of spring. Changing our clocks back and forth affects the sleep patterns of most of us, although we adjust in a day or so.

States and US territories that do not observe daylight saving time include Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and most of Arizona. The bill also amended the Uniform Time Act on 1966 that changed the start and end dates of daylight savings time starting in 2007.

He pointed out that even though Daylight Saving Time means losing just one hour, it has large health consequences.

The widely held belief that daylight-saving time was established to benefit farmers is untrue. "Frequent and uncoordinated time changes cause confusion, undermining economic efficiency".

Daylight Saving Time 2017 (note: it is Saving is singular) begins at 2 a.m. on Sunday, March 12, and ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, November 5. You don't care what the clock is.

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