Total Solar Eclipse Over The US

Total solar eclipse to hit the United States for the first time in 99 years

Total solar eclipse to hit the United States for the first time in 99 years

During the solar eclipse, the moon will pass between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun for nearly 90 minutes. Our graphic explains exactly what one is, shows it's path and some how-to viewing tips.

It begins on August 21, and it's been nicknamed the "Great American Eclipse". The last time that it happened where we had a total solar eclipse in the United States that went coast to coast was 1918.

A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon gets in the way of the sun, turning day to an eerie twilight.

Let this sink in, no one you probably know has ever seen this in their lifetime.

The roughly 75-mile strip of darkness will race from southwest OR to SC at about 1,700 miles per hour, bringing a sudden drop in temperature drop and the sight of the sun's seldom-seen corona. Totality will be 90 seconds to 2 minutes in each city.

An estimated 12 million people live within the path of totality, according to Space.com. Eclipses aren't that rare...they happen about once a year.

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